New publication: Chronology of natural selection in Oceanian genomes

Members of the Papuan Past Project published a study on June 30th 2022 in iScience. The researchers detected signals of selection on genes involved in immunity and diet, and dated them to the initial settlement of Sahul around 50k years ago, in agreement with archaeological data.

Graphical representation of the genetic adaptations of the Melanesian populations
dating back to the initial settlement of Sahul (© Nicolas Brucato)

Abstract

As human populations left Asia to first settle in Oceania around 50,000 years ago, they entered a territory ecologically separated from the Old World for millions of years. We analyzed genomic data of 239 modern Oceanian individuals to detect and date signals of selection specific to this region. Combining both relative and absolute dating approaches, we identified a strong selection pattern between 52,000 and 54,000 years ago in the genomes of descendants of the first settlers of Sahul. This strikingly corresponds to the dates of initial settlement as inferred from archaeological evidence. Loci under selection during this period, some showing enrichment in Denisovan ancestry, overlap genes involved in the immune response and diet, especially based on plants. Pathogens and natural resources, especially from endemic plants, therefore appear to have acted as strong selective pressures on the genomes of the first settlers of Sahul.

Reference

Chronology of natural selection in Oceanian genomes. Brucato N., André M., Hudjashov G., Mondal M., Cox M.P., Leavesley M., Ricaut F.-X. 2021, published the 30th of June 2022 in iScience, 104583, doi: 10.1016/j.isci.2022.104583


OpenEdition suggests that you cite this post as follows:
Papuan Past Project Editors (July 3, 2022). New publication: Chronology of natural selection in Oceanian genomes. Papuan Past Project. Retrieved July 13, 2024 from https://doi.org/10.58079/snw3


Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search